UN ceasefire monitors arrive in Yemen

The UN team is due to secure the functioning of the port and supervise the withdrawal of fighters from the city.
Saturday 22/12/2018
UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres (R) holds a press conference together with UN special envoy to Yemen Martin Griffiths following the Yemen talks in Sweden, on December 13, 2018. (AFP)
Process in motion. UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres (R) holds a press conference together with UN special envoy to Yemen Martin Griffiths following the Yemen talks in Sweden, on December 13, 2018. (AFP)

LONDON – A UN team tasked with monitoring Yemen’s fragile ceasefire in the port city of Hodeidah has arrived in Aden, Yemen, news reports said.

The team, led by retired Dutch General Patrick Cammaert, stopped in Aden where the internationally recognised government of President Abd Rabbo Mansour Hadi is based. Cammaert was to meet with leaders, a Yemeni official said, before heading to rebel-held Sana’a and then to Hodeidah.

The team arrived December 22, a day after the UN Security Council unanimously approved a resolution authorising the deployment of observers to Hodeidah, a port city that is the entry point for most imports into Yemen.

The UN team is due to secure the functioning of the port and supervise the withdrawal of fighters from the city.

UN Security Council Resolution 2451, drafted by Britain, endorsed the outcome of UN-brokered peace negotiations in Sweden, where warring parties agreed to the Hodeidah truce, which went into force December 18.

The resolution “insists on the full respect by all parties of the ceasefire agreed” for Hodeidah. It authorised the United Nations to deploy a team to monitor the ceasefire. The team has an initial mandate of 30 days.

Yemen’s internationally recognised government renewed its commitment to respect the truce accord reached during Yemen talks in Sweden. A Houthi spokesman called the resolution an “important step.”

The resolution endorsed the results of negotiations that included an agreement to withdraw fighters in Hodeidah, a major gateway for aid and food imports.

(With Agence France Presse.)