Morocco’s Bouznika brings together Libyan MPs

Talks that come ahead of Tunisia talks slated for November 9.
Friday 06/11/2020
Representatives of Libya’s rival administrations attend a meeting in the Moroccan town of Bouznika, south of the capital Rabat, on October 3. (AFP)
Representatives of Libya’s rival administrations attend a meeting in the Moroccan town of Bouznika, south of the capital Rabat, on October 3. (AFP)

RABAT– Libyan politicians from the war-ravaged North African nation's rival administrations met for the latest round of peace talks in Morocco on Thursday.

The lawmakers met in the coastal town of Bouznika, south of Morocco's capital Rabat, for talks that come ahead of a major meeting in Tunisia slated for November 9.

The talks follow a "permanent" UN-backed ceasefire agreement signed in Switzerland last month, intended to pave the way for a political solution to the country's grinding conflict.

Libya, with Africa's largest proven crude oil reserves, has been wracked by conflict for nearly a decade, since the overthrow and killing of long time ruler Muammar Qaddafi in the wake of a NATO-backed uprising in 2011.

It has since been dominated by armed groups and divided between two administrations that have been bitterly-opposed: the Government of National Accord (GNA) in the capital Tripoli, and a rival administration in the east backed by Libyan National Army (LNA) commander, Field Marshal Khalifa Haftar.

Warring factions returned to the negotiating table in September in UN-supported talks, with negotiations being held in Libya, Morocco, Egypt and Switzerland.

Details of the agenda of the talks in Morocco have not been released.

Negotiators are pushing parallel efforts to broker peace, with the military section of talks taking place this week for the first time on Libyan soil, in the remote Saharan town of Ghadames.

Members of Libyan joint military commission pose for a group picture in Ghadames, some 465 kilometres southwest of the capital Tripoli, on November 3. (AFP)
Members of Libyan joint military commission pose for a group picture in Ghadames, some 465 kilometres southwest of the capital Tripoli, on November 3. (AFP)

On Tuesday, rival military officers sat together in a joint military commission and agreed on a roadmap for implementing the ceasefire deal.

They  agreed on a roadmap for implementing a ceasefire deal reached last month, UN acting Envoy to Libya Stephanie Williams said Tuesday.

The two sides agreed to “establish a military subcommittee to oversee the withdrawal of military forces to their respective bases and the departure of foreign forces from the front lines,” Williams said.

The commission also decided to “meet in Sirte as soon as possible” and make the central coastal city its headquarters, Williams added.

She added the agreement also called for “military deals on training inside Libya” to be frozen and for foreign trainees to leave the country.