Iran’s satellite launch reflects larger failure

The satellite exploded and fell to Earth before reaching orbit.
Sunday 16/02/2020
An image grab from footage obtained from the state-run Iran Press news agency on February 9, 2020 shows the impact of a launched newly-unveiled Raad-500 missile. (AFP)
An image grab from footage obtained from the state-run Iran Press news agency on February 9, 2020 shows the impact of a launched newly-unveiled Raad-500 missile. (AFP)

Despite the usual propaganda rituals that accompany its regime-orchestrated events, Iran’s celebration of the 41st anniversary of the Islamic Revolution highlighted Tehran’s problems with the world and with its own population.

For the occasion, Iran attempted to launch a satellite into orbit. The celebratory intent of the launch was illustrated by the name given to the satellite:  Zafar — Farsi for “Victory,” it was called. “Failure” could have been a more appropriate name.

The satellite exploded and fell to Earth before reaching orbit. The attempt triggered suspicions of an intent by Tehran to use its space programme for ballistic development purposes, especially that Tehran also unveiled a new a short-range ballistic missile. The Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps’ website said the Raad-500 missile was equipped with new-generation engines.

France, among other Western countries, condemned the launch, “which calls on technologies used for ballistic missiles and, in particular, intercontinental ballistic missiles.”

“Iran’s ballistic programme hurts regional stability and affects European security. France calls on Iran to fully respect its international obligations in this matter.”

In the usual propensity of the regime at exaggerating and distorting the facts, Information and Communications Technology Minister Mohammad-Javad Azari Jahromi still found reason to celebrate.

“But We’re UNSTOPPABLE! We have more Upcoming Great Iranian Satellites!” he tweeted, before euphemistically admitting that “sometimes life does not go the way we like it to go.”

Life is bound to continue not going Tehran’s way as long as its rulers follow aggressive and costly ambitions that have nothing to do with the demands of their increasingly discontented population.

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