Ikram 2, Morocco’s plan for promoting rights of women

Over several stages, Morocco had developed indicators to track the development for women in political, economic, social or cultural fields.
Sunday 09/06/2019
Moroccan women sit in an examination room alongside men in Rabat. (AFP)
Equal opportunities. Moroccan women sit in an examination room alongside men in Rabat. (AFP)

RABAT - Groups focused on social development and family care praised Morocco’s achievements towards sustainable development and social justice, with the principles of equity and equality between the sexes among its priorities.

Experts said the advancement of women in Morocco and having them assume a more equitable place as essential development partners in all fields cannot be achieved without supporting women in legal rights and civil, political, economic, social and cultural freedoms.

Moroccan Minister of Solidarity, Women, Family and Social Development Bassima Hakkaoui said Morocco made great efforts to advance women’s conditions and to devise legislation concerning the issue compatible with international treaties and by adopting amendments designed to improve women’s status in a variety of fields, opening real opportunities for them to actively participate in the society’s progress.

Hakkaoui explained that, over several stages, Morocco had developed indicators to track the development for women in political, economic, social or cultural fields. She mentioned the strategic framework for the interventions of actors, which was put in place at the beginning of the millennium and which constitutes the framework related to the integration of a gender approach in development policies and programmes.

During a meeting of the technical committee in charge of following up on the government’s Ikram 2 equity plan, Fatima Berkane, director of the Women’s Affairs Section at the Ministry of Family, Solidarity, Equality and Social Development, said the Moroccan Constitution recognised the principles of equality and equal opportunities between individuals and groups and prioritised strengthening the rights of women because advancing their conditions is crucial to the development drive.

Berkane said Ikram 2 is innovative in its approach and aspirations, the result of a long process that started with an evaluation of the government’s Ikram 1 plan and included consultations with partners from government sectors, civil society, the private sector, universities, trade unions, development agencies and municipalities.

She said Ikram 2 adopts a range of approaches, including results-based planning to support impact-based programming, as well as inclusion and approaches that enable close engagement with the needs of citizens, in partnership with regional actors, civil society associations and the private sector. The plan includes seven axes, four of which are theme-based and three cross-sectional, supported by a system of governance.

In a previous meeting, Hakkaoui said the plan has 23 goals based on indicators to measure the effects of the programme. She praised the work of the technical committee that worked with officials from ministerial departments responsible for monitoring the implementation of Ikram.

Observers from the EU Commission were present during the discussion of the outcomes of workshops included in Ikram 1 and Ikram 2, as well as the discussion of the challenges and difficulties that may hinder the achievement of these goals.

The goals of both Ikram phases, especially institutionalisation of equality through the creation of mechanisms or introducing sectoral strategies, represent the basis of a culture of gender integrated planning in Morocco, as well as in the economic empowerment of women, which is a priority of the plan in addition to combating discrimination and violence against women.

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