‘Fateen,’ a children’s TV series with a message

“Fateen” is targeted at children under the age of 9. It seeks to encourage children to research, innovate and learn.
Saturday 24/08/2019
A grab shows a scene from the Emirati animated series “Fateen.” (Al Arab)
A desire to learn. A grab shows a scene from the Emirati animated series “Fateen.” (Al Arab)

DUBAI - After enjoying a successful first season, the production team of the Emirati animated series “Fateen” recently began work on a second season.

The series, produced by the children’s TV channel Majid, revolves around a 7-year-old boy named Fateen, who is curious and passionate about asking and researching questions. Fateen loves reading, science, innovation and imagination. In each episode, he embarks on an adventure to give young viewers a piece of information or a different way of thinking and researching.

Fateen lives with his parents and sister, as well as the robot Shahiro. He has a small laboratory at home where he performs simple experiments with the help of his father, robot and sister.

“Fateen” is a cartoon targeted at children under the age of 9. It seeks to encourage them to research, innovate and learn. Like other programmes and materials offered by the Majid TV channel since its launch in 2015, it mainly targets Arab audiences and presents content harmonious with their values ​​and customs.

The management of the channel said “Fateen” aims, through an interesting and attractive presentation, to inspire children to move towards creative and innovative thinking and encourage them to ask questions and look for the answers, without forgetting fun and humour.

Majid TV produced other series before “Fateen” but it may be the most successful, given the techniques used in its production. The first season of “Fateen” contained 26 episodes of about 15 minutes each.

Fateen is the latest character developed in the well-known cartoon magazine Majid. The channel’s officials said the main idea behind turning this specific character into a TV programme was to simplify science for children and emphasise important values, ​​such as promoting tolerance and coexistence. This can be seen in the relationships between Fateen and his friends, who are from various countries, which mirrors the United Arab Emirates’ current reality.

Fateen’s voice is provided by a young boy and the character’s sister by a girl. This is unusual compared to other local and dubbed foreign cartoons in which voices are often rendered by adult actors.

Majid TV CEO Mariam al-Serkal said relying on the voices of child performers makes the cartoon more credible and spontaneous. The children involved were selected from a large number of precocious young people.

The episodes were written to inspire children to move towards creative and innovative thinking and encourage them to ask questions and look for answers, just as Fateen does. Each episode’s plot centres on a specific scientific fact and its details and applications in testable inventions. It helps viewers, whether children or adults, overcome some of the obstacles faced in everyday life.

Majid TV is expected to produce more programmes along the lines of “Fateen.” After a hiatus, production work on new episodes for “Kaslan” was completed. The episodes, which focused on the role of women in society, were aired after Ramadan.

The first issue of Majid magazine was published in 1979 as part of a broad cultural project for Arab children under the auspices of UAE founder Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan al-Nahyan. The magazine is distributed throughout the Arab world and its characters have been well received by millions of young readers.

Majid TV channel owns the copyright of all cartoon characters developed for Majid magazine. The channel is owned by the Abu Dhabi Media Foundation. The channel’s launch is a continuation of the magazine’s strategy to provide educational and entertainment content for Arab children.

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