Europe is betting on Iran at expense of Iraq

By supporting the Iran-affiliated Iraqi government, the Europeans prefer to use Iraq’s demise as payment for saving Iran from US sanctions.
Sunday 25/11/2018
Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif leaves after a meeting with European Union foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini at the EU Council in Brussels, Belgium, May 15, 2018. (Reuters)
Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif leaves after a meeting with European Union foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini at the EU Council in Brussels, Belgium, May 15, 2018.

Nobody has asked the European Union not to support Iraq, neither is the European Union required to boycott Iraq because of its corrupt politicians. Iraq is already a fragmented country and it should not be further marginalised in a humiliating manner.

During the 1990s, Iraq was subjected to what no other country had been subjected to in modern times. It was humiliated, starved, isolated, exhausted and emptied, eventually leading to its military occupation and the consequent deficiencies in its political, economic, social and cultural structures. Iraq has lost its independence, will, freedom, cultural heritage and regional role. It has now become a mere failed state, referred to as a model of endemic corruption, which in turn makes it appear as though that were its unavoidable fate.

Today’s Iraq is ageless. It is neither a child to be handheld until it grows up nor is it an adolescent to be advised until it matures and becomes an adult. Nor is Iraq a young man who should take control of his destiny guided by experience. Finally, Iraq is not even adult enough to impart any wisdom or leave a legacy.

The truth of the matter is that Iraq is all of those things, but with more evil aspects than good ones. It’s a concentration of what ought to be feared simply because its wealth has attracted all kinds of evil characters, bandits and parasites.

The European Union has repeatedly expressed support for Iraq’s government. But the country is a mine that can explode with its people at any moment. Shouldn’t the EU then be the first to express concern over the plight of the Iraqi people after they have been transformed into chronic victims?

It is also very sad to witness such an insulting gesture towards the Iraqi people as the EU’s expressions of sympathy for Iran in the face of US sanctions. It is indeed a scandal that reveals an absolute absence of the humanitarian perspective that must precede any political action.

The Iraqi people are suffering from the fragility of their state and the weakness of a government dominated by sectarian militias. Iraq is a country occupied by Iran for all practical purposes. Therefore, Iraq needs support to break away from Iran so as to emerge onto the world as an independent country that puts its wealth in the service of its people.

Iraq needs help to assert its authority on its geographic borders with Iran so that it can truly separate its national policy from Iranian dictates.

Iraq, which has been devastated by years of war, needs assistance in order to elaborate an economic vision that would help it rebuild its infrastructure, eradicate poverty and unemployment and join the ranks of countries fighting illiteracy, ignorance and underdevelopment.

Iraq needs someone to wake it up from the world of superstition and thrust it into the modern era and not someone who would fetter it further to the mullahs’ regime as the European Union endeavours to do.

The EU’s accursed initiative has shown that Brussels views Iraq as a cow whose milk will help them save the mullahs’ regime. Europe is brazenly and arrogantly betting on the Iranian regime despite being well aware of the dangers posed by that regime’s policies for the whole region in general and Iraq in particular.

In reality, by supporting the Iran-affiliated Iraqi government, the Europeans prefer to use Iraq’s demise as payment for saving Iran from US sanctions. That price is incompatible with the humanitarian values championed by Europe. If Europe’s attitude towards Iran were genuinely motivated by humanitarian values, it should have sought different ways to save the Iranian regime other than by sacrificing the Iraqi people.

But Europe is basing its approach to the issue on economic considerations. So from that perspective, it finds no moral impediment to praising the Iraqi government’s dependence on the ayatollahs’ regime in Iran and placing its experts at the service of that government in order to slip into further dependence, which increases the dominance of Iranian militias in Iraq.

Another soft war is being waged by Europe against Iraq, except that this time its dark face is bare and exposed.

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