Archaeological exhibitions showcase Saudi heritage

The “Archaeological Discoveries Exhibition,” featuring 44 historical objects recently unearthed, drew the largest crowd.
December 10, 2017
Visitors take a selfie in the National Museum in Riyadh

Riyadh - Introducing Saudi cultural her­itage and raising awareness among Saudi nationals about the role their country played in shaping the region’s history were at the core of a series of ar­chaeological exhibitions organised in parallel with Saudi Arabia’s First National Antiquities Forum.

The programmes, established by the National Museum in Riyadh, feature artefacts and archaeological relics discovered in excavation sites across the kingdom.

“Each year joint Saudi and for­eign exploration teams excavate rare historical objects from various sites, further supporting the belief that the Arabian Peninsula had a pivotal role in shaping the modern and contemporary history (of the region),” Mohamad Halwi, an ar­chaeology expert at the National Museum in Riyadh, told daily Al Arab.

The exhibitions, which run through December 18, include the “Masterpieces of the Kingdom,” “Historical Photos Exhibition,” “Saudi Pioneering Archaeologists,” “Specialised Antiquities Book Fair,” “Recovered Antiquities Exhibi­tion,” “Archaeological Discoveries Exhibition” and “Exhibition of At­tention of Kings of the Kingdom on the National Heritage in collabora­tion with King Abdul Aziz Dara.” There is also a photo gallery on the renovation project of Al Hijaz rail­way station in Medina in collabora­tion with Al Turath, the Al Madinah charitable heritage foundation.

The “Archaeological Discoveries Exhibition,” featuring 44 recently unearthed historical objects, drew the largest interest from museum visitors, Halwi noted. He said new findings indicated that “the Ara­bian Peninsula had a central role in international trade due to its strate­gic location as a link between East Asia on one hand and Europe and the rest of the world on the other hand.”

Among artefacts displayed at the “Archaeological Discoveries Exhibi­tion” were a medium-sized, cream-coloured chiselled clay jar, a small rounded partially broken pottery piece with colourful decoration, a bronze warrior tool and an en­graved sandstone incense burner discovered at the Oum Dorg exca­vation site.

Also on display are bronze coins from Roman times, silver curren­cies of the Ottoman Empire from the early 19th century and a 56cm-long bronze sword found on the site of a tombs’ excavation in Ain Dalaa in al Kharg in 2013.

The exhibits have attracted large crowds, including Saudis, foreign­ers and nationals from Gulf coun­tries enthusiastic to learn about the kingdom’s history and cultural heritage.

Abdel Aziz Salem, a Saudi uni­versity student, said learning about his country’s heritage conferred a sense of pride and self-confidence.

“We have a remarkable history. Saudi Arabia has witnessed impor­tant historical phases and contrib­uted in the making of contempo­rary history. We should raise future generations to appreciate our cul­tural heritage and great history,” Salem told Al Arab.

Fahed al-Anzi, another visitor to the show, stressed the need to pro­mote visiting national museums among Saudis.

“It is surprising to see our com­patriots racing to visit museums abroad when they do not even think of going to museums at home. There is definitely a need to raise awareness about our cultural heritage and the treasures that we have,” Anzi said.

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